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•   Ed Vaillancourt  10/24
•   Linda Calderon (Martin)  10/24
•   Gary Bland  10/12
•   Leslie Fluke  8/23
•   Cholly King (Johnson)  8/17
•   Ty Self (Hise)  8/11
•   Jay Powelson  8/9
•   Dawn Higgins  7/21
•   Betty Hughes (Barker)  7/1
•   Charles Barone  6/29
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 Official Website for VHS Class of 64

Updated Monday, February 15, 2016

Occasionally, some youngster makes a comment about how 'easy' our growing up years must have been, compared to today.  

OK...we choose to remember the best moments, and the fun times.  But, ours was not a history without some incredible changes.  Have your younger generations watch this SlideShow and the Billy Joel song.  EVERY generation has it's moments... bet you forgot some of these:


PS  After you watch it through to the end, this slide show has some wonderful tricks.  If you right click on any slide, you'll be taken to an explanation of what the slide is about (doesn't work in Fullscreen Mode).  Fascinating!!



And this didn't even touch on Viet Nam and 'the rest'.  As the song says:

Click Here    We Didn't Start the Fire...             



Or Here→  And here's another link..            










Mr Beaty and Mr Babcock's great articles are still on the website

Click on 'Our Teachers >>In the News' on the Left Margin




Our Bulletin Board for Classmates

Click Here ⇒     Bulletin Board                     



If you like Oldies and Videos here's a great website:  

Click Here for 'Oldie' Videos

Thanks to Classmate Nick Pavlakovitch for the tip 




To visit the 'Yesterday' page: Click here



Be sure to scroll all the way to the bottom of this page for additional content

(*Note to visitors: Links and pages marked with asterisks* are available only to signed in and validated Classmates.  Visitors please check details in this link)


**This Web site is completely free to all Class of 64 Valley classmates.  The website is run by your classmates, not by a 'for profit corporation'.  All the information and pictures for the recent (Sept 2014) 50th reunion are on this website.  Also many pictures provided by your classmates are viewable on classsmates profiles when you sign in (and have been validated).  You'll also find pictures from many previous reunions. 


We have 168 classmates signed on to our website.  Join us! 

Go Vikings!



 Our Website has had 55,426 visits since we started up in September 2012





I know some of you will not understand this message, but I bet you know someone who might.

I came across this phrase yesterday.


A term I haven't heard in a long time, and thinking about 'fender skirts' started me thinking about other words that quietly disappear from our language with hardly a notice like 'curb feelers' And 'steering knobs.' (AKA)'suicide knob,' 'Hollywood spinners.''neckers knobs.'

Since I'd been thinking of cars, my mind naturally went that direction first.

Remember 'Continental kits?'

They were rear bumper extenders and spare tire covers that were supposed to make any car as cool as a Lincoln Continental.

When did we quit calling them 'emergency brakes?

At some point 'parking brake' became the proper term. But I miss the hint of drama that went with 'emergency brake.' I'm sad, too, that almost all the old folks are gone who would call the accelerator the 'foot feed.'

Many today do not even know what a clutch is or that the dimmer switch used to be on the floor. For that matter, the starter was down there too.

Didn't you ever wait at the street for your daddy to come home, so you could ride the 'running board' up to the house?

Here's a phrase I heard all the time in my youth but never anymore - 'store-bought.' Of course, just about everything is store-bought these days. But once it was bragging material to have a store-bought dress or a store-bought bag of candy.

'Coast to coast' is a phrase that once held all sorts of excitement and now means almost nothing. Now we take the term 'worldwide' for granted. This floors me.

On a smaller scale, 'wall-to-wall' was once a magical term in our homes. In the '50s, everyone covered his or her hardwood floors with, wow, wall-to-wall carpeting! Today, everyone replaces their wall-to-wall carpeting with hardwood floors. Go figure.

When was the last time you heard the quaint phrase 'in a family way?' It's hard to imagine that the word 'pregnant' was once considered a little too graphic, a little too clinical for use in polite company, so we had all that talk about stork visits and 'being in a family way' or simply 'expecting.'

Apparently 'brassiere' is a word no longer in usage. I said it the other day and my daughter cracked up. I guess it's just 'bra' now.

'Unmentionables' probably wouldn't be understood at all.

I always loved going to the 'picture show,' but I considered 'movie' an affectation.

Most of these words go back to the '50s, but here's a pure '60s word I came across the other day 'rat fink.' Ooh, what a nasty put-down!

Here's a word I miss - 'percolator.' That was just a fun word to say.
And what was it replaced with? Coffee maker. How dull!

Mr. Coffee, I blame you for this.

I miss those made-up marketing words that were meant to sound so modern and now sound so retro. Words like 'Dyna Flow' and Electrolux' and 'Frigidaire'. Introducing the 1963 Admiral TV, now with 'Spectra Vision!'

Food for thought.

Was there a telethon that wiped out lumbago? Nobody complains of that anymore. Maybe that's what Castor oil cured, because I never hear mothers threatening kids with Castor Oil anymore.

Some words aren't gone, but are definitely on the endangered list.
The one that grieves me most is 'supper.' Now everybody says 'dinner.' Save a great word.

Invite someone to supper. Discuss fender skirts.

I thought some of us of a 'certain age' would remember most of these.

Hello Viking Classmates - The election season is again well underway. (Some may say it never seems to end). It is common therefore, that folks will be talking about this. This is our right as Americans and it is well and good.that we do this. Some would like to share their political thoughts with others via our webite. However, in the past we have received comments that not eveyone wants to receive emails through our website that express political opinions. Out of respect for these wishes, yet still wishing to provide a way for classmates to participate in such discussions, we established a user forum called "Political Free For All" on our site. It is an enter at your own risk forum where political dialogue is expected and encouraged. It can be accessed by clicking on the User Forums and Help tab on the left side of our home page. Want to vent about politics? There's your place! Thank you all for your cooperation in this.

Bob Lowder, Site Administrator


1. It's time to use the money you saved up. Use it and enjoy it. Don't just keep it for those who may have no notion of the sacrifices you made to get it. Remember there is nothing more dangerous than a son or daughter-in-law with big ideas for your hard earned capital. Enjoy the present moment. The sand in the clock may run out at any moment.

2. Stop worrying about the financial situation of your children and grandchildren. You've taken care of them for many years, and you've taught them what you could. You gave them an education, food, shelter and support. The responsibility is now theirs to earn their way.

3. Keep a healthy life with moderate exercise (like walking every day), eat well and get your sleep. It's easy to become sick, and it gets harder to remain healthy. Keep in touch with your doctor, get tested even when you're feeling well. Stay informed.

4. Always buy the best, most beautiful items for your significant other. The key goal is to enjoy your money with your partner. One day one of you will miss the other, and the money will not provide any comfort then. Enjoy it together.

5. Don't stress over the little things. You've already overcome so much in your life. You have good memories and bad ones, but the important thing is the present. Don't let the past drag you down or the future frighten you.

6. Regardless of age, always keep love alive. Love your partner, love life, love your family, love your neighbor, your surroundings, your country. We are never old as long as we have intelligence and affection.

7. Be proud, both inside and out. Don't stop going to your hair salon or barber. Do your nails, go to the dermatologist and the dentist. Keep your perfumes and creams well stocked. When you are well-maintained on the outside, it seeps in, making you feel proud and strong on the inside.

8. Don't lose sight of fashion trends for your age, but keep your own sense of style. There's nothing sillier than an older person trying to wear the current fashion among youngsters. You've developed your own sense of what looks good on you - keep it and be proud of it. It's part of who you are.

9. Read newspapers, watch the news. Go online and read what people are saying. Make sure you have an active email account and try to use some of those social networks. You'll be surprised which old friends you'll meet. Keeping in touch with what is going on and with the people you know is important at any age.

10. Respect the younger generation and their opinions. They may not have the same viewpoints as ours, but they are the future and will take the world in their direction. Give advice, not criticism, and try to remind them of yesterday's wisdom that still applies today.

11. Never use the phrase: "In my time." Your time is now. As long as you're alive, you are part of this time. You have been younger, but you are still you now, having fun and enjoying life.

12. Some people embrace their golden years, while others become bitter and surly. Life is too short to waste your days in the latter mode. Spend your time with positive, cheerful people, it'll rub off on you and your days will seem that much better. Spending your time with bitter people will make you older and harder to be around.

13. Do not surrender to the temptation of living with your children or grandchildren (if you have a financial choice, that is). Sure, being surrounded by family sounds great, but we all need our privacy. They need theirs and you need yours. If you've lost your partner (our deepest condolences), then find a person to move in with you and help out only if you feel you really need the help or do not want to live alone.

14. Don't abandon your hobbies. If you don't have any, make new ones. You can travel, hike, cook, read, dance. You can adopt a cat or a dog, grow a garden, play cards, checkers, chess dominoes, golf. You can paint, volunteer at an NGO or collect certain items. Find something you like and spend some real time having fun with it.

15. Even if you don't feel like it, try to accept invitations. Baptisms, graduations, birthdays, weddings, conferences. Try to go. Get out of the house, meet people you haven't seen in a while, experience something new (or something old). But don't get upset when you're not invited. Some events are limited by resources, and not everyone can be hosted. The important thing is to leave the house from time to time. Go to museums, go walk through a field. Get out there.

16. Be a conversationalist. Talk less and listen more. Some people go on and on about the past, not caring if their listeners are really interested. That's a great way of reducing the desire to speak with you. Listen first and answer questions, but don't go off into long stories unless asked to. Speak in courteous tones and try not to complain or criticize too much unless you really need to. Try to accept situations as they are. Everyone is going through the same things, and people have a low tolerance for hearing complaints. Always find some good things to say as well.

17. Pain and discomfort go hand in hand with getting older. Try not to dwell on them but accept them as a part of the cycle of life we're all going through. Try to minimize them in your mind. They are not who you are, they are something that life added to you. If they become your entire focus, you lose sight of the person you used to be.

18. If you've been offended by others, forgive them. If you've offended someone - apologize. Don't drag resentment around with you. It will make you sad and bitter. It doesn't matter who was right. Someone once said, "Holding a grudge is like taking poison and expecting the other person to die." Don't take that poison. Forgive and move on with your life.

19. If you have a strong belief, savor it. But don't waste your time trying to convince others. They will make their own choices no matter what you tell them, and it will only bring you frustration. Live your faith and set an example. Live true to your beliefs and let that memory sway them.

20. Laugh. Laugh A LOT. Laugh at everything. Remember, you are one of the lucky ones. You managed to have a life, a long one. Many never get to this age, never get to experience a full life. But you did. So what's not to laugh about? Find the humor in your situation.

21. Take no notice of what others say about you and even less of what they might be thinking. They'll do it anyway, and you should have pride in yourself and what you've achieved. Let them talk and don't worry. They have no idea about your history, your memories and the life you've lived so far. There's still much to be written, so get busy writing and don't waste time thinking about what others might think. Now is the time to be free, at peace and as happy as you can be!

From Dawn Higgens:


I came across this saying again today, and as we are all aging just a little, thought it might be appropriate and amusing!!

As I've aged, I've become kinder to myself, and less critical of myself. I've become my own friend.

I have seen too many dear friends leave this world, too soon; before they understood the great freedom that comes with aging.

Whose business is it, if I choose to read, or play, on the computer, until 4 AM, or sleep until noon? I will dance with myself to those wonderful tunes of the 50, 60 & 70's, and if I, at the same time, wish to weep over a lost love, I will.

I will walk the beach, in a swim suit that is stretched over a bulging body, and will dive into the waves, with abandon, if I choose to, despite the pitying glances from the jet set.
They, too, will get old.

I know I am sometimes forgetful. But there again, some of life is just as well forgotten. And, I eventually remember the important things.

Sure, over the years, my heart has been broken. How can your heart not break, when you lose a loved one, or when a child suffers, or even when somebody's beloved pet gets hit by a car? But, broken hearts are what give us strength, and understanding, and compassion. A heart never broken, is pristine, and sterile, and will never know the joy of being imperfect.

I am so blessed to have lived long enough to have my hair turning gray, and to have my youthful laughs be forever etched into deep grooves on my face. So many have never laughed, and so many have died before their hair could turn silver.

As you get older, it is easier to be positive. You care less about what other people think. I don't question myself anymore. I've even earned the right to be wrong.

So, to answer your question, I like being old. It has set me free. I like the person I have become. I am not going to live forever, but while I am still here, I will not waste time lamenting what could have been, or worrying about what will be. And I shall eat dessert every single day (if I feel like it).

Posted By Dawn Higgens - May 25, 2016